Colour selection is a key element when building a strong brand. At The Blog Studio, colour selection has always been an element that clients seem to struggle most with. Some clients overlook the importance of colour in branding their product or service, while others are unable to decide on a colour that best reflects the brand.

Choosing the right colour is worth the time and effort. It has been?reported by current marketing research that approximately 80% of?what we assimilate through the senses is visual.?

image

More than Personal Preference I often hear clients say, “I don’t like red. I don’t like green. I don’t want it to be blue, but I love pink.” These comments are based on personal preference. It is important that an individual like the branding and design of their product and website. It is equally important to think of what emotions are evoked by the end-user in response to your colour selection.

?

Colour can be a tricky topic to negotiate.You have to step into your?clients’ shoes, and ask how they perceive the colour choices for a particular?project. Do they have the same positive emotional response you have??Examine your colour design choices from every possible angle, including?aesthethics, and the geography of your audience.

Color choices may signify one thing in the West, and have a different, or?wholly opposite meaning in the East. The best colour selection combines?personal preference with public perception.

?

Emotions Associated with Colours

Colors, like smells and sounds, conjure an immediate emotional reaction in people. As a designer, it is necessary to know the emotions that are associated with the?different colours. To denote calm, excitement, or complexity to your clients, thought?must go into choosing the right color. You need to figure out how people respond to colours used in a specific design capacity. You must choose colors that will bring?maximum emotional impact, while appearing attractive.

?

Consider how your clients will respond to colour choices. Part of this is knowing?which colours evoke emotions that represent your brand and industry. A company within a conservative industry may not want to use loud colours, because they lack the needed gravity. Then again, a company could purposefully use an unexpected colour to distinguish itself from the competition, but it must be a carefully considered choice.?

image

Colour selections can complement one another, or contrast one another. There are strategic uses for each case. Colours that complement each other are more appealing to the eye. Colours that contrast each other can help items stand?out. Decide which is a better fit for your project right in the beginning. It will?make selecting the correct palate much simpler.

?

Usability

You may have created the most gorgeous site or logo, with an exquisite pallette,?but if no one can read it, it’s an automatic failure. Colours play a practical role in?how people receive information. As most people realize, black on white is the?easiest to read, on paper and on computer screens. The most legible of all?colour combinations are black on yellow, green on white, and red on white.

Here are some simple guidelines to help you choose the right colors for nearly any project.

?

Tips on Choosing Colours for Emotional Impact

  • Of the primary colours, blue is considered the most calming and suppresses appetite. Red is said to increase blood pressure and heartbeat, while yellow evokes cheerfulness. Children tend to prefer primary colours.
  • Nonprimary colours are more calming than primary colours. Pink is said to enhance appetite, while black (like blue) suppresses appetite.
  • Colour shade also matters when trying to evoke different emotions. Green gives the feeling of nature, calmness, and freshness, but certain shades can also give the feeling of envy and?possessiveness. Black can be gloomy and scary, but can also be elegant and sleek. Red can be associated with the joy of Christmas, but also with blood.
  • Colour can help determine the worth of an item, so choose thoughtfully. Forest green and burgundy appeal to the wealthiest 3% of Americans and often raises the perceived price of an item.?Conversely, orange is often used to make an expensive item seem less expensive.
  • Too many colours can make things busy and chaotic, which generally will make a website less user-friendly.

More: continued here